Case

Carbon dioxide emissions down at the Koskenkorva plant

Barley field at Koskenkorva
We want to participate in the development of renewable field biomasses in Finnish energy production
Antti Snellman, Koskenkorva Plant Manager

In its first year of operations, the bioenergy power plant at Altia’s Koskenkorva plant reduced the production plant’s carbon dioxide emissions and increased its self-sufficiency in terms of fuel in steam generation.

The 10-megawatt bioenergy power plant, which began full-scale operations in January 2015, uses barley husk as its primary fuel. The bioenergy power plant makes it possible for Altia to utilize practically 100 percent of the barley grain in its year-round production of grain spirit and starch. In 2015, Altia purchased 191 million kilos of domestic barley, or approximately 15 percent of the Finnish barley harvest.

An infographic about Koskenkorva distillery's CO2 emissions 35% reduction

Lower carbon dioxide emissions and higher self-sufficiency in terms of fuel

The use of renewable fuel helped the Koskenkorva plant reduce its fossil carbon dioxide emissions by 35 percent in 2015. The ethanol distillation process requires a significant amount of steam, and more than 95 percent of the climate impacts of alcohol production are generated during the distillation of ethanol.

The plant’s self-sufficiency in terms of fuel in steam generation increased to 46 percent for the full year and reached 61 percent in December. Prior to the new bioenergy power plant, the plant’s fuel self-sufficiency in terms of fuel in steam generation stood at approximately 20 percent.

“At the current rate, we will reach our fuel self-sufficiency target of more than 60 percent by summer 2016. I’m very pleased with the level of commitment and determination our team at Koskenkorva has demonstrated in working to ensure that we reach our shared target,” says plant manager Antti Snellman.

In terms of the technology and fuels it uses, the power plant is the first of its kind in Finland.

“We want to participate in the development of renewable field biomasses in Finnish energy production and diversify our core competencies as an industrial user of barley,” Snellman explains.